Wrinkle Relaxers


Wrinkle relaxer injections (Neuromodulators) can reduce the signs of ageing by smoothing out and relaxing the facial muscles that cause lines and wrinkles. Amongst the most common areas to be treated are frown lines, forehead lines and crows feet.

Wrinkle relaxers can also be used to deliver successful results in jawline slimming (masseters) and to reduce excessive sweating in the armpits (hyperhidrosis). Wrinkle relaxer injections work by temporarily blocking the transmitting signal between the nerve and muscle cells which in turn prevents the muscle from contracting. When the muscle isn’t able to contract the appearance of the existing wrinkle is reduced.

Effects can last up to 3 - 5 months depending on the area and dose injected.

Neuromodulators have been clinically trialled and studied for more than 20 years and have been used therapeutically in large doses to treat children as young as 2 yrs of age with equine foot as a result of Cerebral Palsy. Cosmetically, very small amounts are strategically injected into the muscle to relax the repetitive facial movements that cause lines and wrinkles to form.

How long does the treatment take?

For first time visitors to tWR. an initial consultation is conducted and a long term treatment plan is discussed initially to ensure your expectations are realistic and achievable. Once the treatment plan is agreed upon the actual treatment can take only 15-20 mins with no down time expected.

How long does the treatment last?

Results can last anywhere between 3 - 5 months. The longevity of the treatment is dependent on the area and the dose injected. Clinical studies have shown that one particular wrinkle relaxer product can last up to 5 months when injected in the frown line, however results vary from person to person. Results will begin to show within 7 days with optimal results occurring at 21 days after treatment.

Are there any risks?

The wrinkle relaxer injections available in Australia have been extensively researched and have been proven to be safe for most. As with any medication, potential complications and side effects can occur but are uncommon:

Common side effects

  • Bruising
  • Swelling
  • Mild headache

Uncommon side effects (rare)

  • Localised numbness
  • Drooping of eyebrow, eyelid, mouth
  • Ptosis (Fluid retention of lower eye lid)

Do I need to prepare in advance?

With any injectable treatments it is advisable to avoid - 

  • Aspirin, ibuprofen and naproxen 10-14 days prior to treatment to minimize the risk of bruising.
  • Some vitamin and herbal supplements can also have a blood thinning effect and should be avoided include: gingko, garlic, fish oil and vitamin E.
  • Alcohol consumption can increase the risk of bruising and should be avoided 2 days prior to treatment.
  • If you have a history of cold sores, be sure to notify your provider prior to your appointment and he or she will prescribe a medication to take the night before that will reduce the likelihood of a breakout.

Is there any after care or downtime?

  • Patients can generally leave the clinic and return to work and or other activities almost immediately.
  • Please do not massage the area, lie down or bend over in the 4 hours following treatment.
  • It is advised to avoid excessive exercise immediately after treatment. You may resume your normal exercise routine the following day.
  • Some studies show that to maximise the results, you should make facial expressions as instructed by your provider in the few hours after the treatment.
  • Injection sites may be noticeable for a few hours after the treatment including redness and swelling. 
  • If bruising occurs, it can last for up to 2 weeks after treatment (rare).
  • You may apply mineral makeup immediately after treatment and continue your regular skin care products.

Who is not suitable for treatment?

  • Pregnant and breastfeeding women should avoid treatments as there is not sufficient clinical data to support safe treatment in this group
  • Patients with muscle or nerve conditions such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS or Lou Gehrig’s disease), myasthenia gravis, or Lambert-Eaton syndrome should avoid treatment.

How much does the treatment cost?

Please see pricelist list for various packages offered.